Cannabis indica or Indian hemp

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Cannabis indica or Indian hemp is a non-scientific common name that may refer to a number of plant species and varieties.

Nomenclature

Other Names:

Historical Use of Cannabis indica or Indian hemp

Cannabis indica or Indian hemp in Traditional Chinese Medicine

Description

Historical Use of Cannabis indica or Indian hemp in Western Medicine

Quote Paraph: "Cannabis indica, which was first recommended in epilepsy by Dr. Reynolds,1 is sometimes, though not very frequently, useful. It is of small value as an adjunct to bromide, but is sometimes of considerable service given separately. It may be noted that the action of Indian hemp presents many points of resemblance to that of belladonna; it is capable of causing also delirium and sleep, first depression and then acceleration of the heart, and also dilates the pupil. The cerebral excitement is relatively more marked, and the effect on the heart and pupil much less than in the case of belladonna. [PARAGRAPH BREAK] In the following case its effect was far more decided than that of bromide:—"[...] "1 Loc. cit., p. 321. It has been lately recommended also by Sinkler (Philadelphia Med. Times, Sept., 1878)."
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Primary Source: Gowers, WR. Epilepsy and other chronic convulsive diseases. New York. William Wood & Company. 1885. p. 223.

Background

Synonymns for Cannabis indica or Indian hemp

Patent Medicines and Medicines with Multiple Ingredients that include Cannabis indica or Indian hemp

Pharmaceutical Information

Chemical Constituents

Evidence or the Use of Cannabis indica or Indian hemp in the Treatment of Epilepesy

Basic Science

Animal Studies

Cohort, Case-Control and Non-Randomized Trials

Randomized Controlled Trials

Meta-Analysis

1st Five Results: pubmed search

Mitchell L Doucette, Kevin Borrup, Garry Lapidus, Jennifer M Whitehill, Alex McCourt, Cassandra K Crifasi
Effect of Washington and Colorado's cannabis legalization on death by suicides.
Prev Med: 2021;106548
[PubMed:33838156] [WorldCat.org] [DOI] (I a)

Michael Wainberg, Grace R Jacobs, Marta di Forti, Shreejoy J Tripathy
Cannabis, schizophrenia genetic risk, and psychotic experiences: a cross-sectional study of 109,308 participants from the UK Biobank.
Transl Psychiatry: 2021, 11(1);211
[PubMed:33837184] [WorldCat.org] [DOI] (I e)

Ruth Elizabeth Evans, Sophie Herbert, William Owen, Deepak Rao
Case of e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) in London, UK.
BMJ Case Rep: 2021, 14(4);
[PubMed:33837028] [WorldCat.org] [DOI] (I e)

Mohammad-Reza Ghovanloo, Koushik Choudhury, Tagore S Bandaru, Mohamed A Fouda, Kaveh Rayani, Radda Rusinova, Tejas Phaterpekar, Karen Nelkenbrecher, Abeline R Watkins, Damon Poburko, Jenifer Thewalt, Olaf S Andersen, Lucie Delemotte, Samuel J Goodchild, Peter C Ruben
Cannabidiol inhibits the skeletal muscle Nav1.4 by blocking its pore and by altering membrane elasticity.
J Gen Physiol: 2021, 153(5);
[PubMed:33836525] [WorldCat.org] [DOI] (I p)

Aleksandar Trajkovski, Eddy Lang
Haloperidol as an anti-emetic for Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome in the ED.
CJEM: 2021;
[PubMed:33835429] [WorldCat.org] [DOI] (I a)

Safety

Allergies

Side Effect and Warnings

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Adverse Effects